Fast fashion - is there anything we can really do?

ShoppingTelly

Help Support ShoppingTelly:

merryone

Registered Shopper
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
6,408
Location
brighton
I've been watching sewing bee so I know of the lovely/dapper Patrick Grant who has just brought out a book called "Less" which encourages us to learn to live with less "rubbish" and when it comes to clothes to buy a smaller amount of good quality timeless pieces that will last us a lifetime - Good thinking Patrick .....but!!! I watched a podcast he did on this subject and I got the impression he's preaching to the converted. During the podcast he mentioned a co-operative he manages, a company called Community Clothing that produces good quality garments which are all made from natural fabrics and manufactured in the UK. He said that he uses the word "clothing" as opposed to "fashion" as it indicates that you're not buying something that's here today and gone tomorrow in landfill no doubt. He reeled off all the shocking statistics and had a good old swipe at the brainless influencers (not quite put like that but heavily implied) who are showing off their Shein/Temu hauls ad nauseam. I had a quick gander at the website and as expected the offerings were very pricey and definitely not to my taste as the majority of garments were "utilitarian" but would be best described as "hipster" which is definitely not me. I totally get that he's doing his bit which is admirable. I try to do my bit too though it's easy at my age where I'm in a better financial position than I was in my youth and I couldn't give a flying toss what's in or out of fashion. I rarely buy new clothes and when I do it's on a one in one out basis and the discarded item will be donated to the nearest charity shop, I look after my clothes too and will attempt to repair rather than replace. Despite this being sound advice, it's not what it's all about is it? The money's in fashion - gone are the days where we had an Autumn/Winter and a Spring/Summer collection, nowadays changes are being made on almost a weekly basis and there'll always be a huge contingent of mainly young people who feel they have to keep up with the trends and of course the cheaper the better. I cannot see an end to it, in fact I can only see it getting worse!
I know Patrick Grant is doing a good thing, and I'm sure he's not the only one, but imho I don't think it would hurt for him to perhaps give a nod to what's in fashion and produce some garments that would appeal to a wider audience, 'cause lets face it, if we like something, we'll buy it and continue to wear it long after it's no longer "the thing"! but then again the Shein/Temu ladies don't give a stuff as long as the clothes "hold out" for as long as the particular trend is current - A bit of a catch 22 really. Big problem but no real solution! I'll carry on doing my bit anyway!
 
I've been watching sewing bee so I know of the lovely/dapper Patrick Grant who has just brought out a book called "Less" which encourages us to learn to live with less "rubbish" and when it comes to clothes to buy a smaller amount of good quality timeless pieces that will last us a lifetime - Good thinking Patrick .....but!!! I watched a podcast he did on this subject and I got the impression he's preaching to the converted. During the podcast he mentioned a co-operative he manages, a company called Community Clothing that produces good quality garments which are all made from natural fabrics and manufactured in the UK. He said that he uses the word "clothing" as opposed to "fashion" as it indicates that you're not buying something that's here today and gone tomorrow in landfill no doubt. He reeled off all the shocking statistics and had a good old swipe at the brainless influencers (not quite put like that but heavily implied) who are showing off their Shein/Temu hauls ad nauseam. I had a quick gander at the website and as expected the offerings were very pricey and definitely not to my taste as the majority of garments were "utilitarian" but would be best described as "hipster" which is definitely not me. I totally get that he's doing his bit which is admirable. I try to do my bit too though it's easy at my age where I'm in a better financial position than I was in my youth and I couldn't give a flying toss what's in or out of fashion. I rarely buy new clothes and when I do it's on a one in one out basis and the discarded item will be donated to the nearest charity shop, I look after my clothes too and will attempt to repair rather than replace. Despite this being sound advice, it's not what it's all about is it? The money's in fashion - gone are the days where we had an Autumn/Winter and a Spring/Summer collection, nowadays changes are being made on almost a weekly basis and there'll always be a huge contingent of mainly young people who feel they have to keep up with the trends and of course the cheaper the better. I cannot see an end to it, in fact I can only see it getting worse!
I know Patrick Grant is doing a good thing, and I'm sure he's not the only one, but imho I don't think it would hurt for him to perhaps give a nod to what's in fashion and produce some garments that would appeal to a wider audience, 'cause lets face it, if we like something, we'll buy it and continue to wear it long after it's no longer "the thing"! but then again the Shein/Temu ladies don't give a stuff as long as the clothes "hold out" for as long as the particular trend is current - A bit of a catch 22 really. Big problem but no real solution! I'll carry on doing my bit anyway!

When I was working two of the young girls in the office went to Primark to buy clothes,jewellery(?) bags etc for the weekend then threw it away and did the same the following weekend!!
The problem is you have always had people saying if it hasn't been worn for 6 months then it needs getting rid of,well I've got my holiday clothes that are over 10 years old,still look great and aren't dated.
 
When I was working two of the young girls in the office went to Primark to buy clothes,jewellery(?) bags etc for the weekend then threw it away and did the same the following weekend!!
The problem is you have always had people saying if it hasn't been worn for 6 months then it needs getting rid of,well I've got my holiday clothes that are over 10 years old,still look great and aren't dated.
Blimey that really is extreme! I've also heard the suggestion that one should jettison the clothes you seldom wear in some ways that makes sense just so long as you dispose of them thoughtfully ie donate/sell/put into clothes recycling bank but throwing stuff away beggars belief. There's another problem that doesn't ever get a mention when it comes to buying less and that is the wearer's changing figure. Spend £100+ on a well made durable garment that fits beautifully until you gain or lose weight. Do you hang on to it just in case, or do you get rid of it? Whatever you decide to do, you'll still need something to wear, so off to the shops you go to buy more clothes and the chances are you'll think twice about spending so much money on a single garment. There are so many ifs and buts that it's a problem that at best we can only chip away at. There's been great innovations in technology over the years but when it comes to something as simple as dressing ourselves the past was a better place. None of this fast fashion stuff is ever gonna make it to a Vintage clothes shop!
 
I've got my holiday clothes that are over 10 years old,still look great and aren't dated.
I am currently wearing a fleece from way back. My second to last job was between 2001 and 2012 and I was wearing it back then, if not further back. Granted it looks a little worse for wear, but as long as I can fit in it, and it's comfortable, why not? I can see no point in 'fast' fashion. Also puts me in mind of 'designer names' for kids. I think designer clothes should be reserved for those who, for the most part, have stopped growing. A YSL for a 2 year old? WASTE of money, even if it does look good on them.
 
Most of the clothes sold on QVC are throw away because of the low quality fabrics they use and bad workmanship on the garments. Ben di Lisi's fashions may be a exception. Ruth says her clothes are 'keepers' and perhaps it's true but I won't buy any more from her because they simply don't fit me properly. Kim & Co wears like iron, but it all polyester.
 
Most of the clothes sold on QVC are throw away because of the low quality fabrics they use and bad workmanship on the garments. Ben di Lisi's fashions may be a exception. Ruth says her clothes are 'keepers' and perhaps it's true but I won't buy any more from her because they simply don't fit me properly. Kim & Co wears like iron, but it all polyester.
A LOT of bamboo clothing from Gemporia. One of the best items to wear for comfort: not lying about that, in my opinion, it has to be one of the least lasting items to wear. I literally had a pair of socks that started to 'hole' within the first week of wear. Again, fast fashion is 'throw away'. MOST modern productions, be they clothes or otherwise are throw away. Money makers over and over at the expense of quality. You buy quality and although it costs more, it lasts longer and it makes you want to go back to the originator. Complete side note: I do that ;) I needed an 'emergency' umbrella once. Had one, but it was at home. Bought one from the 'classic' pound shop: with no great expectations. I used it from 'the shop' to the bus and the bus to the dustbin. Literally, as soon as I got off the bus, I threw it in the bin. Yes, a tangent, but a comment on quality and 'fast'. :p
 
I've got a long, black skirt that I bought 30 years ago. I don't wear it much but it's good to have when I need it. I've also got a Burberry raincoat that is 20 plus years old. I can't see either of these garments ever wearing out or needing replacement.
 
I've got a long, black skirt that I bought 30 years ago. I don't wear it much but it's good to have when I need it. I've also got a Burberry raincoat that is 20 plus years old. I can't see either of these garments ever wearing out or needing replacement.
Another pointless comment from me. I do like 'designer' but can't afford them, so tend to get them from charity shops, or in the case of this item, a market stall. £3 (it was around 30 some years ago) for a two piece YSL suit that the stall holder's son grew out of. Needless to say, I have long since grown out of it, but still. The other item was Sketchers shoes £20 from a charity shop, wore those til they wore out and now I do tend to go for that brand of shoe. Cheap via the second hand, and still long lasting and consequently value for money.
 
I've bought a whole plethora of things from charity shops & bootsales over the years and have got some incredible bargains. I never buy anything that looks even the slightest bit worn though, sometimes I've bought stuff with the tags still on them, I've seen quite a few items with a Shein label and none of them have looked particularly badly made if I'm honest but it's the ethos behind these ultra-fast fashion retailers that's questionable. Don't get me wrong, I've got clothes from outlets that are let's say not famous for their ethics, and no doubt some of the stuff I've got is not as "squeaky clean" as the label would suggest. It's something I've not given any thought to in the past, but I've been doing a bit of homework inspired by good old Patrick and I was quite surprised to learn what brands fall under the heading "fast fashion". Fast fashion however, is one thing - ultra fast fashion is another. Going off at a tangent here, I've got a friend who's developed a serious shopping addiction for dresses and handbags in particular. She's a pretty high earner and historically her purchases have come from the high end of the market. Just recently though she's discovered that if you spend less, you get a lot more, so she's much less discerning than she used to be, buying up all manner of cheap looking garments. Recently she told me that she bought 3 dresses from Asda when she went to do her grocery shop and her words were "I didn't need them but they were only £12 each so it would've been rude not to"! She also showed me a picture of a "jacket" she'd ordered from Shein which was a very plasticky looking white lace cardigan with an acrylic trim. I can only describe this garment as "horrible" and when she asked me whether I like it, instead of me saying what I thought which was "What the hell, there is no excuse for buying hideous shite like this" I said "I can't wear lace as I find it a bit scratchy" and I quickly changed the subject. When the oldies are getting drawn in, there really is no hope!
What can be done? I'll hand it to Love Island though (not that I watch the show - ugh) they're sponsored by Ebay and dress their contestants in "pre-loved" clothes which sends out a very good message. If more can be done to make these influencers "uncool" it would be good, I'm sure it wouldn't stop them buying the stuff but it would stop the encouragement of it. It's like the demise of the dreaded Qurio - I wonder now whether the fact they can't do their vids any more has taken the edge of their out of control spending, hey, probably not lol!
 
Last edited:
I buy cheaper clothes from the supermarket, Matalan and some Primark, but I try to look after them and get plenty of wear out of them.
There are these apps where you can sell on your clothes, but I get the impression they are looking for name brands, not budget purchases.
I'm guessing that the target audience for fast fashion will age out of it when they have to earn their own money and/or have other priorities for their money and/or life changes.
I'm probably not as good as I could be about putting my unwanted clothes in a charity bag or in a fabric donation bin.
 
My granddaughter who`se 18 in a few weeks refuses to buy new clothes. She wears stuff from ebay, vinted and a local secondhand market. The only thing she buys new is footwear which mainly consists of Doc Marten boots which last her about 3 years or more. The last pair she outgrew so I`ve just bought her a new pair for her 18th birthday which cost me £200 but she`ll wear them to the death as long as her feet don`t grow again which I doubt they will now she`s 18, the last pair she got for her 15th birthday.
She was here the other day and showing me her latest secondhand purchase which was a satin bomber jacket covered in patches and badges and it cost her a fiver. She`s very much into her own style, doesn`t bother following fashion, hates places such as Primark, Matalan etc but loves a good rummage in a charity shop.
Yesterday I was reading the local paper online and up popped an advert for a sewing course. It lasts 5 days, they provide you with everything which you can keep after the course, not including the sewing machine obviously but all fabrics, patterns, pins, scissors, instructions , threads etc and it`s for absolute beginners. At the end of the course they say you will have at least one completed garment and several smaller items on which you`ve learned. I think the Sewing Bee on tv is encouraging people who may never have done sewing at school or never learned from a parent to have a bash but to be honest I think the £500 charge for the course, plus you will also need a machine at home if you intend to carry on sewing, would be well out of reach for many people.
Back in my day we girls all did sewing and cookery as part of our education and many of us had Mums or Grans who sewed and knitted too. I hated sewing and still do to this day but I can at least do minor repairs, replace a button, hem and basic things which stops me from discarding stuff as some people would do.
 
My granddaughter who`se 18 in a few weeks refuses to buy new clothes. She wears stuff from ebay, vinted and a local secondhand market. The only thing she buys new is footwear which mainly consists of Doc Marten boots which last her about 3 years or more. The last pair she outgrew so I`ve just bought her a new pair for her 18th birthday which cost me £200 but she`ll wear them to the death as long as her feet don`t grow again which I doubt they will now she`s 18, the last pair she got for her 15th birthday.
She was here the other day and showing me her latest secondhand purchase which was a satin bomber jacket covered in patches and badges and it cost her a fiver. She`s very much into her own style, doesn`t bother following fashion, hates places such as Primark, Matalan etc but loves a good rummage in a charity shop.
Yesterday I was reading the local paper online and up popped an advert for a sewing course. It lasts 5 days, they provide you with everything which you can keep after the course, not including the sewing machine obviously but all fabrics, patterns, pins, scissors, instructions , threads etc and it`s for absolute beginners. At the end of the course they say you will have at least one completed garment and several smaller items on which you`ve learned. I think the Sewing Bee on tv is encouraging people who may never have done sewing at school or never learned from a parent to have a bash but to be honest I think the £500 charge for the course, plus you will also need a machine at home if you intend to carry on sewing, would be well out of reach for many people.
Back in my day we girls all did sewing and cookery as part of our education and many of us had Mums or Grans who sewed and knitted too. I hated sewing and still do to this day but I can at least do minor repairs, replace a button, hem and basic things which stops me from discarding stuff as some people would do.
Your granddaughter sounds like an amazing young woman. I seem to remember you posting a picture of her all ready to go to her school prom and she looked wonderful in her vintage outfit! I've got to be honest if all this throwaway fast fashion and easy pays been available when I was a youngster I'm sure I'd have been all over it. We didn't even have Primark until I was in my 20's - Funnily enough I don't remember buying a lot from there because they weren't the fashion forward brand they are now, and there was a bit of a stigma attached to shopping there. Looking back I enjoyed rummaging through the bargain baskets on the pavements outside the shops, pouring over my mum's catalogue and persuading her to let me order stuff promising I'd pay up regularly (which I rarely did, sorry mum!) and borrowing and swapping clothes with my mates - I often wore my mum's clothes 'cause she was the same size as me and dressed quite fashionably! Happy days
 
I buy cheaper clothes from the supermarket, Matalan and some Primark, but I try to look after them and get plenty of wear out of them.
There are these apps where you can sell on your clothes, but I get the impression they are looking for name brands, not budget purchases.
I'm guessing that the target audience for fast fashion will age out of it when they have to earn their own money and/or have other priorities for their money and/or life changes.
I'm probably not as good as I could be about putting my unwanted clothes in a charity bag or in a fabric donation bin.
I can never be bothered with these far to much of a faff so I always donate to the charity shop. Even though I realise I could earn some good money from my unwanted stuff I'm actually quite happy for a good cause to benefit instead. On the second point this audience will be replaced by the next generation, unless something happens to slow it down or stop it, sadly I cannot see what or how.
 
Your granddaughter sounds like an amazing young woman. I seem to remember you posting a picture of her all ready to go to her school prom and she looked wonderful in her vintage outfit! I've got to be honest if all this throwaway fast fashion and easy pays been available when I was a youngster I'm sure I'd have been all over it. We didn't even have Primark until I was in my 20's - Funnily enough I don't remember buying a lot from there because they weren't the fashion forward brand they are now, and there was a bit of a stigma attached to shopping there. Looking back I enjoyed rummaging through the bargain baskets on the pavements outside the shops, pouring over my mum's catalogue and persuading her to let me order stuff promising I'd pay up regularly (which I rarely did, sorry mum!) and borrowing and swapping clothes with my mates - I often wore my mum's clothes 'cause she was the same size as me and dressed quite fashionably! Happy days
I remember C&A when I was a teenager, not expensive and not polyester either.
 
When it comes to following fashion, I think the last time I really cared was in my teenage years and I liked the stuff without question because I wanted to look like everybody else. The fashions that stick out in my mind are checked hacking jackets, gypsy skirts, worn with ankle socks and jelly sandals, drainpipe jeans, pastel coloured angora sweaters, a line midi skirts and what my mum used to call orthopaedic shoes. In my late teens there was a craze for wearing tight jeans with your dad's jumper and pixie boots and the whole look was finished off with a Yasser Arafat scarf and if you were really brave, a beret! When I hit my twenties I don't remember any must have looks, but shopping in mainstream fashion stores like Miss Selfridge, Chelsea Girl, Dotty P's etc you'd be safe 'cause everything was in season and you'd just pick out what you liked. Clothes were a lot harder to come by in those days, nothing was really cheap unless you rummaged through the bargain baskets, and credit wasn't handed out like sweets!
 
We have a "Freebie Friday" on the local facebook group for my estate.

I've had all sorts of items, for example, virtually new Timberland walking boots that cost almost £200. I wear them most of the time now, but I would never dream of buying them at that price. Not to mention 3 flat-screen TVs which are all in use, one as a screen for my PC.

There are loads of clothes given away, especially for children. And loads of houehold items, kitchen gadgets (recently been 3 breadmakers and several air fryers) and last week, a Juke Box!!
 
I noticed in Lidl that they are now selling clothes and shoes with large LIDL logos on them. I don't think they will catch on as a designer brand, I wouldn't want to go around wearing them.
Lol! I collect all that stuff 'cause I wear it to my pop festival every year....I've got the whole kit and caboodle. The only thing I wear outside of the festival is the Christmas jumper 'cause everybody wears daft jumpers at that time of year!
 
I noticed in Lidl that they are now selling clothes and shoes with large LIDL logos on them. I don't think they will catch on as a designer brand, I wouldn't want to go around wearing them.

Greggs have doing this for a while via Sports Direct IIRC. Personally I think it looks ridiculous but I've seen quote a few people wearing Greggs sliders over the last couple of weeks in the nice weather.
 
I remember C&A when I was a teenager, not expensive and not polyester either.
Oh, yes! Loved C & A and shopped there as a student and found such bargains in their sales - one was a lovely stone coloured raincoat with a matching scarf which I still have (luckily, it was loose fitting, otherwise....hmm... I don't think I could get in it today, or not without a crowbar). It's been washed (not dry clean only) so many times. Bought some nice cotton dresses for summer too - all well made and if you shopped in the sales you got some real bargains. I still miss them, particularly for coats, jackets and macs, as they did some great styles and good quality, ideal if you were on a tight student budget, as I was (and didn't want to wear clothes Mum had made for me - sorry, Mum).
 

Latest posts

Back
Top